Herbalism often makes use of bone broths

Healthy Herbal Bone Broth Recipe

This healthy herbal bone broth recipe takes the benefits of bone broths to the next level.

Bone broths have recently become popular even though they have been consumed throughout history. They are simply animal or fish bones boiled into a nutrient-dense stock. By adding beneficial herbs you are getting the most out of your broth. It truly is comforting superfood.

These broths can be sipped on or used as a base for soups, stews, gravies and sauces.

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Let’s first look at how this healthy herbal bone broth recipe supports health and wellbeing. Then we’ll learn how easy it is to make.

Bones Suitable for the Broth

Use bones from beef, lamb, turkey, chicken, fish or other types of animals. You can find them in most grocery stores at the meat department. It’s always best to find organic and free-range. Ideally, you save bones from other meals and make the broth soon after or freeze for later.

Discover how this healthy herbal bone broth recipe takes the benefits of bone broths to the next level. Easily add herbal medicine for the additional benefits. #OnlineHerbalismCourse

Bones are rich in nutrients, especially vitamins. They also contain collagen, which upon cooking, turns into gelatin providing the body with important amino acids. These amino acids support joint health, connective tissue health and help to reduce inflammation. Chronic inflammation can lead to serious chronic diseases.

Some of the amino acids help with digestive issues such as leaky gut or inflammatory bowel disease. Bone broths are also easy to digest. The high protein levels of bone broth help the body to feel more full while consuming less calories. This is helpful for those trying to lose weight. Finally, the amino acid, glycine helps promote relaxation and better sleep.

For the ultimate healing soup base, be sure to add medicinal herbs to the basic broth recipe below. Click here to read the article about cooking with medicinal herbs in your favorite soup recipe.

How to Make the Healthy Herbal Bone Broth Recipe

The following is the ingredient list:

  • As many leftover bones as you have available. This can also include any remaining meat or tissues still attached to the bones. If purchasing bones, 3 pounds should be plenty.
  • Enough water to cover the bones plus an additional 2 inches. You may need to add more as necessary.
  • 2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar. The acidity helps to release nutrients within the bone marrow.
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Medicinal herbs of choice. Click here for options.

Place the bones, water, apple cider vinegar, salt and pepper in a crock pot, or simmer on the stove in a large pot on very low heat for 8 hours. The longer the cooking time the more benefits and the better flavor your broth will have. Add the medicinal herbs during the last hour. Once your broth is done cooking, strain out the solids and keep the liquid for use. Any unused broth can be stored in the freezer for later use.

Feel free to leave any comments or questions below. If you would like to learn more about herbal medicine, check out the Home Herb School at www.homeherbschool.com

6 thoughts on “Healthy Herbal Bone Broth Recipe”

  1. Thank you for reminding me that I can use the left over bones from my meals to make this wonderful bone broth! Will not be tossing out my bones any more.

  2. I recently made my first batch of bone broth. It turned out great and I’ll definitely be saving bones from here on. I have a question for you. I used an electric pressure cooker and it was done in a relatively short time. I was able to crush the bones in my fingertips so I’m guessing I got all the nutrients available out of the bones. My question is do you think there are any disadvantages to cooking quickly under pressure vs low and slow, suck as nutrient loss? I also canned it when I was done to make it shelf stable. Just mostly wondering if I was to use it to combat a cold or illness, if it would be better to slow cook and freeze?

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